Tag Archives: Politics

Gracious in Defeat; Still Proud of America

I had contemplated writing my first post the morning after an Obama win and discussing why Obama will be a disaster, how McCain lost the election, how this election was wholly based on emotion and not issues, and how I think the country will be in a worse way for the next few years.  There will be plenty of time to write about things, things I will begin to write about shortly, including getting Mitt elected in 2012.  But for this post’s purposes I want to really speak from the heart and express the pride I feel as an American.

Indeed this is an historic election for the United States and even the world.  Last night American’s overwhelmingly elected out first Black president.  This accomplishment is nothing to push aside considering America’s history with Black’s.  150 years ago slavery was still prevalent and was only about to be defeated by Lincoln in the civil war, yet even after the emancipation proclamation race continued to be a major issue and the Blacks had little opportunity for success and integration into American society.  It was not until the mid-1900’s and the great civil-rights movement that broke down most of the barriers to Black progress in America.  I have longed believed that true-racism has largely been eradicated in most of America for the last 20 years; certainly there are pockets of bigots and racists throughout the country, but this holds true for whites being racist against Blacks and Blacks being racist against whites (see Jeremiah Wright).  But largely the it seems to me that race has been an overblown issue of late, driven largely by Black activists who need charges of racism to drive there personal agendas.  (I should write a full post about this, because we could even get into the actions of Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson regarding Obama’s campaign, but I digress).   Finally, my belief has been validated.  The election of Barack Obama as President of the United States should eradicate the overblown charges of widespread racism in America.  Issues of race will never be fully gone.  There will always be whites killing blacks because they are black and there will always be blacks killing whites because they are white; sadly, that is reality.  But race is no longer a systemic issue and problem in our country and Barack’s election is the culminating event in Black progress.  I think it reflects great maturity and progress in the U.S. and for that, and that alone, I applaud the election of Barack Obama and the American people.

So congratulations to President Obama and his family on his victory.  I now plan on spending the next four years fighting to get you out of the White House.  That being said, you have a great opportunity to win a lot of McCain voters, like myself, over if you govern as a moderate and pragmatically.  If you show that you recognize the importance of maintaining processes that made America great, like capitalism and small government, freedom of speech, freedom or religion, etc.  I highly encourage you to avoid moving full speed ahead and implementing a large left-wing agenda and socialist policies.  Doing such will alienate many of the people who voted for you (and in 2012 expect the GOP to nominate someone who is not near as terrible a candidate as McCain was).  You and your party have the opportunity to accomplish what the GOP failed to do in last decade when they had all the power, that is to uphold American ideals such as limited government.   A left-wing agenda is the surest way to defeat in 2012, even you had to run to the right to win this election – every Democrat does.   Best of luck for you and your cabinet, I will be praying for your Presidency.

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Filed under Barack Obama, Election 2008, John McCain, Politics, Progress, Progressive

Is Biden Sabotaging Obama?

It is no secret that Joe Biden is a loose canon and often makes statements without thinking them through. While he is a smart guy, he is also an idiot in many ways. Once he gets going on a rant it is hard to slow him down. I think this is what happened yesterday when Biden said that Obama was going to be faced with an international crisis in his first six months. Consider his statements:

“Mark my words,” Biden told donors at a Seattle fund-raiser Sunday night.

“It will not be six months before the world tests Barack Obama like they did John Kennedy. The world is looking. We’re about to elect a brilliant 47-year-old senator president of the United States of America.

“Watch. We’re going to have an international crisis, a generated crisis, to test the mettle of this guy.

“And he’s going to need help . . . to stand with him. Because it’s not going to be apparent initially; it’s not going to be apparent that we’re right.”

What on earth is Joe thinking? If this election turns back to a National Security election and people start believing that there will be a major incident involving our enemies in the first six months, there will be a substantial shift towards John McCain. THe people still trust republicans, and specifically McCain, on security issues.

When people read Biden’s statements many of them will ask themselves if Obama is prepared and ready to handle it. We are talking about the least qualified and prepared Presidential candidate since 1860, if not in America’s history and his running mate is talking about a major crisis in the first six months?? This can only hurt Obama and eat away at his support.

The McCain campaign has already jumped on these statements and are using them to instill doubt in the voters and say that Obama is not ready for this high office. Good for McCain, I would do the same thing, regardless of how true the claims may or may not be.

Joe Biden is a drag on the Obama ticket and was a terrible choice. Fortunately for Obama, people rarely vote based on the Veep candidate, the GOP is the weakest it has been in decades, and Obama has a large lead just two weeks out. Barack will win the election handily, but it will be in spite of Biden.

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Filed under Barack Obama, Election 2008, John McCain, Politics

Barack is Right, but He Should Have Known Better

It is no secret that I am no fan of Barack Obama, but generally speaking I agree with him that this whole Pig comment thing should not really be a controversy.

For those of you who are not familiar with the controversy overtaking the United States, in a speech about economics yesterday, Barack Obama said, “You can put lipstick on a pig, but it’s still a pig.” At first glance most anyone who has been following Sarah Palin and the election could understand how one would think this was a slam against Palin. But when one reads the context for which the comment was made it is clear that he was referring to Bush’s and McCain’s generally similar economic plans. Essentially he said that McCain can talk about change all he wants, referring to the economy, but “You can put lipstick on a pig, but it’s still a pig.” And then he added, immediately following that line, “You can wrap an old fish in a piece of paper called ‘change,’ it’s still going to stink.”

Was it a slight at Palin (referring to the lipstick)? Maybe. Was it a slight at McCain (referring to the ‘old fish’)? Maybe so. I kind of think it was meant to be a subtle jab, but I don’t put much stock into the whole controversy, those phrases were reasonable for the topic to which he was speaking and it probably shouldn’t be the issue it is.

But this politics. Anything one says can be and will be used against the candidate. I find it really disingenuous that Barack is criticizing the McCain camp for using this for political gain, as both parties take statements out of context, just as ridiculous as this, all of the time. Obama and his advisors should have known this and should have known better.

So while I think there is no merit to the attack from the GOP, Barack should have been smarter than this. And it demonstrates his political newness. You see, the most memorable line from Sarah Palin’s speech at the GOP convention was, “What is the difference between a pit bull and soccer mom? Lipstick”. As a result, anytime anyone hears the word lipstick, for whatever reason, voters are immediately going to associate that comment with Sarah Palin. If you think I am wrong, just watch the below video of Barack’s comments and pay attention to the crowd’s response when he says the lipstick line.

That kind of response would not occur in normal circumstances, the people there immediately associated the comment with Sarah Palin. Barack and his advisors should have been aware of this. And making a comment like that, regardless of its innocence and in a climate where Palin is ridiculously popular and any negativity against her that seems remotely unfair only results in increasing her popularity, is a stupid move.

You see, in this election people don’t care about policy. I think most people who have been following the election since the beginning of the primary season were well aware of this. It is about being a fixer and having a responsible leader. Most voters are fickle and fairly ignorant anyway. They don’t want to hear the nuts and bolts of welfare reform or economic policy, they want to be comfortable, safe, and feel like their President is someone they can feel safe with while the sleep. That’s it. So little lapses of judgement like this, by either candidate, is what matters. Because this is the stuff voters pay attention to. Personally, I think it is ridiculous, but it is the nature of the democratic process, at least in this election. And this is why I think McCain will ultimately win. He generally knows how to avoid these mistakes and will make fewer of them than Barack. Game over.

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Filed under Barack Obama, Election 2008, John McCain, Politics, Republicans, Sarah Palin

Obama, Biden, and America’s Victory in Anbar

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Yet again the American (and international) media are completely ignoring a major, major story about Iraq to talk about something far less relevant, in this case, the pregnancy of Bristol Palin’s baby. What story are the missing and failing to report on? The turn over of Anbar province from American forces to Iraqi control.

This is the best and greatest news to come out of Iraq since the announcement that Saddam Hussein was caught. But you won’t find anyone talking about. We all know why they aren’t reporting it, so I spare you the rant, but what should be highlighted over and over again as this election season goes on was how utterly and completely wrong Barack Obama and Joe Biden were on the surge in Iraq.

Both of them (and their whole party) predicted that sending an additional 20,000 troops to Iraq would do nothing but make things worse and keep America in Iraq for eternity. How wrong they were. Because of the surge and General Petraeus’ strategy, plans are in place for American withdrawal, casualties (for both Americans and Iraqis) are the lowest they have been since the beginning of the war, Prime Minister Maliki has established a relatively stable and functioning government, and the Iraqi people are able focus on living their life and building their economic stability. If we had followed the recommendations of Obama and Biden, America would have failed miserably and lost the war completely; Iraq would be another Somalia. Just watch these to hear what Obama and Biden said about the surge:

Barack Obama

Joe Biden

Look, I don’t fault people for being wrong, I am wrong all the time. But at least admit it. At least live up to being wrong. The most frustrating thing about these comments, is that it demonstrates a supreme lack of judgment and objectivity. Joe Biden has been wrong on almost every major foreign policy decision since he began his stint in the Senate, yet Barack Obama chose him as a running mate because of Joe’s foreign policy experience.

The fact is President Bush was right about the surge. Regardless of what you think about the overall war or why we went in there in the first place (which is really completely irrelevant to the current situation) you have to admit that Bush and Petraeus have done a stellar job with the surge. Undoubtedly that one unpopular and politically risky decision saved Iraq and America’s efforts there. The implementation of this strategy and Bush’s “must win” attitude reminds of what my Drill Sergeant’s would tell us in basic training, “The fastest way out of here is to graduate.” Why was it the fastest, because if you screwed up, got hurt, became ill, you would be stuck there until you straightened up or got better. The same applied in Iraq, the fastest way out of Iraq is to win; and that is exactly what is occurring.

And for all of you who always asked the asinine question, “what defines victory in Iraq?” This defines victory in Iraq, or at least this is the teenage version of victory in Iraq. Victory in Iraq is a country that is relatively free, democratic, and can stand on it’s own two feet. That is what is being sewn now. Victory.

I also posted this at swint.instablogs.com

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Filed under Barack Obama, Conservative, Democrats, Election 2008, George Bush, Iraq, John McCain, War

Why did Obama wait so long?

Upon waking up this morning and checking the news I discovered that Barack Obama has chosen Joe Biden to be his running mate for President.  Not a terrible pick, but not his best either.  But the question on the merits of Joe is not the question on my mind.  The question I have is why did Obama wait until the middle-of-the-night on a Saturday morning to announce his Vice Presidential selection?

Anyone who pays attention to the news is well aware that the weekend is the worst time to make an important, seemingly positive, announcement.  The only time politicians release news on a Friday, Saturday, or Sunday is when it is something they hope to have forgotten and buried by Monday.  Even employers wait until Friday afternoon to fire people.

To make matters worse, they announced it in the middle-of-the-night.  Who made that genius decision?  “Hey I’ve got a good idea, lets make the biggest announcement of our campaign for President by announcing on a day and time when the news media and the voters are sleeping and will spend the day recovering from their hang-overs.”

I think the reason they did this was because they wanted to milk the anticipation, they wanted to keep the media focus on them.  They must have figured this was best done by leaking a little info each day, like Obama saying, ‘I know, but I’m not telling.’

Frankly, I think it was a terrible decision. One that will negate any sort of bounce as a result of Biden joining the ticket.  What they should have done is announced last Thursday or Friday that the Veep selection will be made before the convention so that bloggers, media, and everyone else could spend the weekend speculating who and when, on Monday or Tuesday use the ‘I know but I am not telling’ line, and then announced Thursday morning.   Then they would own the news cycle from Thursday through the convention, every pro- and anti- talk show on TV, radio, and internet would be talking about it and blocking any McCain news whatsoever, it would be like a 4-day news coup with at least two of those days being normal news days.

What I find most interesting about Obama’s campaign so far is that overall he has appeared to run a tight ship without any major and dire mistakes, but closer examination reveals little mis-steps, like this, that may not have a negative effect, but did not make the most out a particular situation.  So far these kind of things have been costing Obama at the polls and allowed McCain pull into a tie.  Obama will need to right his ship if he wants to have any hope of winning.  Perhaps the choice of Biden is the first step towards doing that.

Note: Also posted at swint.instablogs.com. Please go there and “star” it!

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How is McCain So Close in the Polls?

I don’t know about you, but judging by the media coverage, the passionate supporters, the image, the speaking ability, the complete animosity toward the Republicans on the part of the general populace, and a very unpopular president, Barack Obama should be running away with this election. Everything seems to be favoring a President Obama, yet John McCain is right on his heels in the polls.  How can this be?

In the latest national polling, McCain has maintained between a 1 and 6 point deficit to Obama.  This appears to be very good news for McCain.  Real Clear Politics national polling average currently has Obama with 46.1% and McCain with 41.7%.  The latest Fox News poll gave Obama a 1 point lead, and as recent as Thursday , the rolling Gallup poll had Obama up 2.  Now in the last two days those gaps have widen, likely as a result of the “Messiah World Tour” Obama went on, and we can expect another narrowing in the next week I would suspect.

So how is it possible the race is this close?  Judging by the current atmosphere, the Democrat candidate should runaway with the election by 10 points and win nearly all the swing states.  But as of now that is not shaping up to be the case, and considering the electoral experience of McCain and the novice Obama, I wouldn’t expect McCain to fall much further behind.

The first reason that the Dems are not running away with this is their choice of candidate.  Barack is a divisive figure, even within the party.  His naive statements on foreign policy and the fact he defeated the queen bee in the nomination fight, turned off a good portion of democratic voters.  The Democrats should have nominated a moderate who could draw in more of the middle, Mark Warner, for example, would have been a run away choice and would have won the White House.

Second, is Barack’s experience.  He is a one term Senator with no executive experience whatsoever.  I have more foreign policy experience than he does.  And he is going up a extremely experienced and qualified Republican.

Third, and the most disappointing, is his name and Muslim background, perhaps even his race.  I hope that this impact is extremely limited, but I wonder, especially the muslim background. I assume this bothers a lot of voters (despite the fact he is a devout Christian now).  I wonder how many people will vote for a guy named Barack Obama?  It is of no issue to me, but I am sure it is to many others.  The fortunate thing for Obama is that many of the voter who don’t like him because of these reasons were likely going to vote for the Republican anyway, regardless of who the Dem nominee is.

Note, The last sentence above is not a criticism of the Republican Party, I don’t believe the GOP as an organization is bigoted or racist in the least, but honest observance and analysis shows that (white) racists usually vote Republican (while Black racists vote Democrat).

The third reason is John McCain.  While I can’t stand the man, he is really the most electable candidate for the GOP to nominate this season.  He is a moderate and has the reputation as a maverick.  He can successfully separate himself from the Bush administration as a result.  He appeals to many independent voters and moderate democrats who are less than thrilled with Obama.  (Here is where McCain’s veep selection may come in handy, and while I think the smartest move would be for him to nominate Sarah Palin.)  And most conservatives who dislike McCain will hold their nose and vote for him just to keep Obama out of the White House.

The final reason I think the race is close is that this is still a divided country.  While party membership numbers are down in the GOP, peoples’ personal political persuasion tend to be more conservative than liberal on average.  I think we will see the divide move even closer to 50/50 as improvments in Iraq continue to be shown and the Bush administration is somewhat vindicated.

All in all, this is a historic election, though I am less than thrilled with our options. If the Democrats lose this one, they just need to disband and start a new party.  (psst, Democratic voters, if you ever want to win a Presidential election when the political atmosphere is mostly neutral – unlike this one – stop nominating people who are the most left-wing and idealistic of your party, and start nominating people who actually somewhat represent mainstream America.  You need a somewhat moderate candidate who is pragmatic and experienced.  Fortunately, for we GOPers, your party isn’t likely to move that way soon as it has been hijacked by the communist wing of the party: I’m looking at you MoveOn and DailyKos.  The GOP had/has this problem with the “religious right”, we have been hijacked by them, but we were pragmatic and voted to win. You didn’t.)

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Filed under Barack Obama, Democrats, Election 2008, John McCain, Politics, Republicans

Is it Mitt?

Over at Race42008, Kavon Nikrad and Jason Bonham posted that Mitt Romney was indeed chosen to be John McCain’s running mate.  It sounds like their source is legit, although that doesn’t mean it will officially be announced right away.  But assuming this is accurate, what should we make of it.

First, despite the fact I have a man crush on Mitt, I don’t really want Mitt to be the McCain’s veep.  Mitt Romney needs to be President at some point.  Joining the sinking ship that is the McCain campaign won’t help this endeavor.  At this point in the race it appears that Obama is going to run away with the election (although current polls are ridiculously close and McCain really has a good shot).  Mitt Romney needs to become head of the Republican National Commitee and do a turn-around project with the party or he needs to run his PAC and help get GOP candidates elected and prepare to beat Obama in 2012.  Does anyone else think this year feels an awful lot like 1996 when the GOP nominated the sacrificial lamb of Bob Dole as the party’s standard bearer?

Even if John McCain wins in November, what good is it going to do for America or the party?  All McCain brings is the same old, more war and a worse economy.  The next four years could be very challenging for the country why not let the Dems wallow in it and bring in Mitt as the “fixer”.

Additionally, despite the fact I think that Obama would be a disaster, I also recognize the Country needs a new feel and pace.   Obama may actually be healthy, so long as it is only 4 years.  This being said, I am highly unlikely to vote for Obama, but I can’t say it is out of the question.  And this brings me back to Mitt and McCain.

The only way that my vote definitely goes for McCain is if he choose Mitt Romney or Sarah Palin as his running mate.  Otherwise it will take a lot of consideration and soul searching.  McCain needs to choose Palin for his VEEP then all my problems are solved. Sadly, this won’t happen.  What will happen, most likely, is that Mitt is his choice.  Good for McCain, good for Mitt, and, hopefully, good for the country.

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Filed under Conservative, Democrats, Election 2008, John McCain, Mitt Romney, Politics, Republicans